Consumer Worship

Often times before I write about a subject, I generally like to take a day, a week or more to gather my thoughts. I read scripture, other commentators, reflect on my life experiences and synthesize it all together. By the time I’m ready to write I feel like I have somewhat internalized the matter and can provide a decent opinion. This is not one of those times. This is one of those subjects where I feel woefully inadequate to communicate in a way that is meaningful to the reader and simultaneously honoring to God. But I will attempt to do so anyway.

The concept of worship, for most in the Evangelical and Charismatic world prompts one to think about the music sung at church. In more traditional circles the word is used in reference to the whole service. Either way, we get the gist that this is supposed to be an act towards God…or do we?

Growing up, I was often apart of churches that boasted high energy singing and preaching. It was usually engaging and dare I say at times entertaining. Then I found myself in a context that no longer catered to the concert style worship I enjoyed. I was forced to learn how to read a hymnal as I repeatedly got lost after the first line! Was God even present? My worship goosebumps had long since gone and there seem to be no ‘shouting’ points in the sermons. This experience had me questioning, what was worship all about?

Many churchgoers select where they choose to worship by the style of music offered, the charisma of the pastor, the beautiful building or the complimentary coffee available at the gift shop, among other things. None of these offerings in and of themselves are wrong. Who doesn’t want to sing along or try not to fall asleep during a sermon? I can only speak for myself, but I’ve had seasons where I found myself bored and not getting much out of the service. The novelty had worn off, so I would show up later and later or some weeks not at all. Was God as bored as I was, because we were not connecting like we were when the they were playing my favorite songs and preaching engaging sermons.

Regularly we approach God during times of worship as a consumer. We come not ready to give but to take. We come with a list of subconscious needs demanding they be met in order for us to properly worship, but do we even understand what worship is?

What is worship?

Jesus once said that true worship was done in spirit and truth. Truth by definition is objective. It is transcendent of our subjective opinions and preferences, just as the spirit is to the material world. True worship transcends my favorite songs, charismatic sermons and social entanglements. Can these elements be conduits? Absolutely, but too often it is made to be the object of our glory. So what is the essence of worship?

Whether defined in Hebrew, Greek, or English it all points to humbling oneself in the presence of one who is greater. It is an act of giving honor to one who is worthy. Worship, by definition reinforces the separation and otherness of God and man, because there is always the distinction between the worshipper and the worshipped. Worship is not a partnership of equals, but God in his wondrous love, bows down to receive our offering. In this, He gives of Himself, which brings about our healing, gives us vision and proclaims truth, which can only be found in Him. But before you can experience true worship, you can have no other gods before Him. There is no room for self-glorification.

During times of worship we must never allow ourselves to simply be the ‘audience’ to what is happening in front and around us. We are to be a part of the giving of ourselves as a love offering to our Lord. After all, who is supposed to be doing the worshipping? So the next time you find yourself in a place of worship, stop looking around for how your needs can be catered to, and ask yourself, what have I to give to the one who has given His all…

For more blog check out:

http://vachelle.wixsite.com/journey/blog/consumer-worship

Submitted by: Vachelle Fleming

 

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